Tuesday, December 15, 2009

Limbo

If we ever move to a new place, remind me to tell you a funny story. Well, it's a stressful story right now, but it will be funny by the time I can tell it. I don't really know who might read this, and well, for now it'll just have to wait.

In the meantime, nothing much is happening on the home selling front. It's not a great time to be selling a house around here. But we knew that. We only need one buyer, and we feel like our place has a lot to offer. Time will tell.

In the meantime, I'm having to temporarily live vicariously through other people's blogs. Our chickens our sold. Our cow is for sale. The garden is put to bed. All the future plans and dreams for this place are packed away. This was our dream house, planned from the ground up by us, so it's bittersweet to be trying to let it go.

Mini-Farm Version 2 is still just an abstract thought. Every time I look at a potential new home, I immediately takes note of which way is south and where the trees are. My brain starts marking out garden beds and fences. A small greenhouse appears, then some solar panels, a wood stove, fruit trees, hazelnut hedges, a chicken coop, and all the other things that fit into the vision. My mind starts budgeting and prioritizing based on the home price, and all the various scenarios that might come up.

And then that house goes off the market.

It's still a fun exercise, but I'm longing to get a move on. I want to sit down with a note pad and aerial photos and a web browser at my fingertips, looking things up and filling in the minutiae, and then doing it. Or doing whichever parts of it time and money will allow. I want to take what I've learned here and improve on it. I want to take the ideas of others and try them out.

Winter is just about here, and that's the time when I normally sit down with all the garden books and seed catalogs and graph paper and figuring it all out. I'll probably still do that, but it's hard knowing that it could all go out the window at any time. In my mind, gardening is not so much an annual activity as an ongoing, long-term process that amounts to more than just this growing season.

In short, it looks like it's going to be a bit of a frustrating winter for me.

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5 Comments:

At 12/16/2009 7:16 AM, OpenID daisyfae said...

a semi-reality based version of Farmville... and it seems much less annoying than the one on Facebook...

 
At 12/16/2009 2:55 PM, Blogger Wendy said...

I can relate ... except that we're not moving, and I still spend too much time on Realtor.com looking at houses, and then, looking at them on google maps and thinking about all of their potential - all the while knowing that this is where we are, and where we're staying.

I'll look forward to hearing your "funny story" ... and I hope it gets funny very soon ;).

 
At 12/17/2009 8:27 AM, OpenID onestraw said...

Was wondering if your recent comments on One Straw had something to do with this, and then I read this post!

Heart is with you man. Time to take on some research / writing projects? I thought I knew alot about soils. Then I read 6 books last month and I blew my mind.

 
At 12/19/2009 9:46 AM, Blogger Madcap said...

e-4, your drive for this really inspires me. Sorry you have a sit-on-your-hands sort of winter, but things change, and when they change, they change all at once! I hope it's not too long a wait.

Best to you and Lorie and the kids.

 
At 8/14/2010 5:39 PM, Anonymous Anonymous said...

Y'know, it's funny. We go in, thinking we're going to do something, and then finding that we've done the grandiose version instead of the manageable one.

When Brian and I married, he wanted THE FARM. And we bought THE FARM. A 150+ year old Victorian farmhouse on 10 acres with barns, coop, hog house... the works. HoMiGosh, what a LOT of work - and so energy INefficient, and so far from his work...! We were drowning under the weight of it.

Now? We're in a double-wide, which sounds crappy, but it's really nice and WAY more efficient. It's one-story (two story houses are like CLEANING two houses!), it's smaller, it's homier. Instead of ten acres, we have two - one is all hardwood, the other has our house and the homestead. We operate out of sheds, not barns.

But it's manageable. We can tend rabbits, chickens, ducks, dog, and goats in a mere 20 minutes time. We have an incredible garden. We're... really where we want to be this time around.

Sounds like you're leaving THE FARM for something more manageable. Kudos to you for that!

-aNNa

 

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